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Cognitive improvement of compound danshen in an Aβ25-35 peptide-induced rat model of Alzheimer’s disease

Overview of attention for article published in BMC Complementary and Alternative Medicine, October 2015
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About this Attention Score

  • In the top 25% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • Good Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (79th percentile)
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (90th percentile)

Mentioned by

news
1 news outlet

Citations

dimensions_citation
9 Dimensions

Readers on

mendeley
28 Mendeley
Title
Cognitive improvement of compound danshen in an Aβ25-35 peptide-induced rat model of Alzheimer’s disease
Published in
BMC Complementary and Alternative Medicine, October 2015
DOI 10.1186/s12906-015-0906-y
Pubmed ID
Authors

Min Liu, Haibiao Guo, Chuyuan Li, Deqin Wang, Jingang Wu, Canmao Wang, Jiangping Xu, Ren-an Qin

Abstract

Senile dementia mainly includes Alzheimer' s disease (AD) and vascular dementia (VD). AD is a progressive and irreversible neurodegenerative disorder that is accompanied with a great deal of social burden. The aim of this study was to investigate the effect of Compound Danshen (CDS) on learning and memory of alzheimer's disease (AD) rat model, as well as to explore the possible connection between CDS and the associated molecules of amyloid beta (Aβ). Rats were injected with Aβ25-35 peptide intracerebroventricularly and CDS were subsequently administered once daily for 23 days. Rats' behavior was monitored using Morris water maze and passive avoidance. Real time PCR and Western blotting were used in determining amyloid precursor protein (APP), β-site APP cleaved enzyme-1(BACE1), Presenilin-1 (PS1), Insulin-degrading enzyme (IDE) and neprilysin (NEP) in hippocampus. The AD model group presented with spatial learning and memory impairments. CDS and donepezil administration significantly ameliorated the Aβ25-35 peptide-induced memory impairment in both Morris water maze (P < 0.05) and passive avoidance task (P < 0.01) compared to the AD model group. Real time PCR results suggested that CDS significantly decreased APP mRNA, PS1 mRNA and increased IDE and NEP mRNA levels. Western blotting analyses showed that CDS decreased the protein expression of APP and PS1 and increased IDE expression. CDS improved spatial learning and memory by down-regulating APP, PS1 levels and up-regulating IDE. In future, CDS may have significant therapeutic potential in the treatment of AD patients.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 28 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 28 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Unspecified 7 25%
Student > Bachelor 6 21%
Researcher 4 14%
Other 3 11%
Student > Master 3 11%
Other 5 18%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Unspecified 7 25%
Medicine and Dentistry 7 25%
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 4 14%
Neuroscience 4 14%
Psychology 3 11%
Other 3 11%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 7. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 30 October 2015.
All research outputs
#861,892
of 6,507,444 outputs
Outputs from BMC Complementary and Alternative Medicine
#293
of 1,731 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#40,549
of 207,486 outputs
Outputs of similar age from BMC Complementary and Alternative Medicine
#8
of 80 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 6,507,444 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done well and is in the 85th percentile: it's in the top 25% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 1,731 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a little more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 6.1. This one has done well, scoring higher than 82% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 207,486 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has done well, scoring higher than 79% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 80 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 90% of its contemporaries.