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Evaluation of selected biological capacities of Baeckea frutescens

Overview of attention for article published in BMC Complementary and Alternative Medicine, June 2015
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Title
Evaluation of selected biological capacities of Baeckea frutescens
Published in
BMC Complementary and Alternative Medicine, June 2015
DOI 10.1186/s12906-015-0712-6
Pubmed ID
Authors

Suerialoasan Navanesan, Norhanom Abdul Wahab, Sugumaran Manickam, Kae Shin Sim

Abstract

Baeckea frutescens is a natural remedy recorded to be used in curing various health conditions. In Peninsular Malaysia, B. frutescens is found on the mountain tops, quartz ridge and sandy coasts. To our knowledge, there is only limited published literature on B. frutescens. B. frutescens leaf crude methanol and its fractionated extracts (hexane, ethyl acetate and water) were prepared. Folin-Ciocalteau's method was used for the measurement of total phenolic content of the extracts. The antioxidant activity was measured by the scavenging activity on DPPH (1,1-diphenyl-2-picrylhydrazyl) radicals, reducing power assay through the Prussian blue complex formation, the metal chelating assay as well as the β-Carotene-linoleic acid system assay. The cytotoxic activity of the extracts were evaluated against two lung carcinoma cell lines with varying molecular characteristics using the MTT [3-(4, 5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl)-2, 5-diphenyltetrazolium bromide] assay. Lastly the toxicity of the crude methanol extract was evaluated using the acute oral toxicity experiment. The methanolic extract with highest phenolic content showed the strongest β-carotene bleaching inhibition, whilst the water extract exhibited the highest activity in metal chelating and reducing power assays. The hexane extract displayed a mild cytotoxic effect on both A549 and NCI-H1299 human lung carcinoma cell lines. No mortalities and no adverse effects were observed in the acute oral toxicity investigation at the highest dose of 5000 mg/kg. The findings in the present study suggest B. frutescens may be considered as a safe source of compounds with antioxidant and cytotoxic properties for therapeutic and functional food applications.

Twitter Demographics

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Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 17 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Turkey 1 6%
Unknown 16 94%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Master 5 29%
Student > Bachelor 5 29%
Professor > Associate Professor 3 18%
Student > Ph. D. Student 2 12%
Researcher 1 6%
Other 1 6%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Medicine and Dentistry 3 18%
Unspecified 2 12%
Pharmacology, Toxicology and Pharmaceutical Science 2 12%
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 2 12%
Earth and Planetary Sciences 2 12%
Other 6 35%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 1. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 14 November 2015.
All research outputs
#5,601,253
of 6,566,187 outputs
Outputs from BMC Complementary and Alternative Medicine
#1,484
of 1,735 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#165,864
of 208,299 outputs
Outputs of similar age from BMC Complementary and Alternative Medicine
#53
of 78 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 6,566,187 research outputs across all sources so far. This one is in the 1st percentile – i.e., 1% of other outputs scored the same or lower than it.
So far Altmetric has tracked 1,735 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a little more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 6.1. This one is in the 1st percentile – i.e., 1% of its peers scored the same or lower than it.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 208,299 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one is in the 1st percentile – i.e., 1% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.
We're also able to compare this research output to 78 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one is in the 1st percentile – i.e., 1% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.