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Free establishment of primary health care providers: effects on geographical equity

Overview of attention for article published in BMC Health Services Research, January 2016
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About this Attention Score

  • Above-average Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (64th percentile)

Mentioned by

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3 tweeters

Citations

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13 Dimensions

Readers on

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39 Mendeley
Title
Free establishment of primary health care providers: effects on geographical equity
Published in
BMC Health Services Research, January 2016
DOI 10.1186/s12913-016-1259-z
Pubmed ID
Authors

David Isaksson, Paula Blomqvist, Ulrika Winblad

Abstract

A reform in 2010 in Swedish primary care made it possible for private primary care providers to establish themselves freely in the country. In the former, publicly planned system, location was strictly regulated by local authorities. The goal of the new reform was to increase access and quality of health care. Critical arguments were raised that the reform could have detrimental effects on equity if the new primary health care providers chose to establish foremost in socioeconomically prosperous areas. The aim of this study is to examine how the primary care choice reform has affected geographical equity by analysing patterns of establishment on the part of new private providers. The basis of the design was to analyse socio-economic data on individuals who reside in the same electoral areas in which the 1411 primary health care centres in Sweden are established. Since the primary health care centres are located within 21 different county councils with different reimbursement schemes, we controlled for possible cluster effects utilizing generalized estimating equations modelling. The empirical material used in the analysis is a cross-sectional data set containing socio-economic data of the geographical areas in which all primary health care centres are established. When controlling for the effects of the county council regulation, primary health care centres established after the primary care choice reform were found to be located in areas with significantly fewer older adults living alone as well as fewer single parents - groups which generally have lower socio-economic status and high health care needs. However, no significant effects were observed for other socio-economic variables such as mean income, percentage of immigrants, education, unemployment, and children <5 years. The primary care choice reform seems to have had some negative effects on geographical equity, even though these seem relatively minor.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 3 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 39 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 39 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Ph. D. Student 3 8%
Student > Doctoral Student 2 5%
Student > Master 2 5%
Student > Postgraduate 1 3%
Other 1 3%
Other 5 13%
Unknown 25 64%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Medicine and Dentistry 3 8%
Social Sciences 3 8%
Unspecified 3 8%
Environmental Science 1 3%
Economics, Econometrics and Finance 1 3%
Other 3 8%
Unknown 25 64%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 3. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 20 March 2018.
All research outputs
#6,582,623
of 12,680,099 outputs
Outputs from BMC Health Services Research
#2,177
of 4,203 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#115,581
of 333,063 outputs
Outputs of similar age from BMC Health Services Research
#1
of 1 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 12,680,099 research outputs across all sources so far. This one is in the 47th percentile – i.e., 47% of other outputs scored the same or lower than it.
So far Altmetric has tracked 4,203 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a little more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 6.4. This one is in the 47th percentile – i.e., 47% of its peers scored the same or lower than it.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 333,063 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 64% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 1 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has scored higher than all of them