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Initial blood pressure is associated with stroke severity and is predictive of admission cost and one-year outcome in different stroke subtypes: a SRICHS registry study

Overview of attention for article published in BMC Neurology, February 2016
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Title
Initial blood pressure is associated with stroke severity and is predictive of admission cost and one-year outcome in different stroke subtypes: a SRICHS registry study
Published in
BMC Neurology, February 2016
DOI 10.1186/s12883-016-0546-y
Pubmed ID
Authors

Chi-Hung Liu, Yi-Chia Wei, Jr-Rung Lin, Chien-Hung Chang, Ting-Yu Chang, Kuo-Lun Huang, Yeu-Jhy Chang, Shan-Jin Ryu, Leng-Chieh Lin, Tsong-Hai Lee

Abstract

To investigate if initial blood pressure (BP) on admission is associated with stroke severity and predictive of admission costs and one-year-outcome in acute ischemic (IS) and hemorrhagic stroke (HS). This is a single-center retrospective cohort study. Stroke patients admitted within 3 days after onset between January 1(st) and December 31(st) in 2009 were recruited. The initial BP on admission was subdivided into high (systolic BP ≥ 211 mmHg or diastolic BP ≥ 111 mmHg), medium (systolic BP 111-210 mmHg or diastolic BP 71-110 mmHg), and low (systolic BP ≤ 110 mmHg or diastolic BP ≤ 70 mmHg) groups and further subgrouped with 25 mmHg difference in systole and 10 mmHg difference in diastole for the correlation analysis with demographics, admission cost and one-year modified Rankin scale (mRS). In 1173 IS patients (mean age: 67.8 ± 12.8 years old, 61.4 % male), low diastolic BP group had higher frequency of heart disease (p =0.001), dehydration (p =0.03) and lower hemoglobin level (p <0.001). The extremely high and low systolic BP subgroups had worse National Institutes of Health Stroke Scale (NIHSS) score (p =0.03), higher admission cost (p <0.001), and worse one-year mRS (p =0.03), while extremely high and low diastolic BP subgroups had higher admission cost (p <0.01). In 282 HS patients (mean age: 62.4 ± 15.4 years old, 60.6 % male), both low systolic and diastolic BP groups had lower hemoglobin level (systole: p =0.05; diastole: p <0.001). The extremely high and low BP subgroups had worse NIHSS score (p =0.01 and p <0.001, respectively), worse one-year mRS (p =0.002 and p =0.001, respectively), and higher admission cost (diastole: p <0.002). Stroke patients with extremely high and low BP on admission have not only worse stroke severity but also higher admission cost and/or worse one-year outcome. In those patients with low BP, low admission hemoglobin might be a contributing factor.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 2 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 30 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 30 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Master 6 20%
Researcher 6 20%
Other 4 13%
Student > Bachelor 4 13%
Student > Postgraduate 2 7%
Other 6 20%
Unknown 2 7%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Medicine and Dentistry 18 60%
Neuroscience 2 7%
Economics, Econometrics and Finance 2 7%
Nursing and Health Professions 2 7%
Sports and Recreations 1 3%
Other 2 7%
Unknown 3 10%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 1. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 06 March 2016.
All research outputs
#3,771,283
of 7,356,005 outputs
Outputs from BMC Neurology
#732
of 1,141 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#152,365
of 281,752 outputs
Outputs of similar age from BMC Neurology
#19
of 32 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 7,356,005 research outputs across all sources so far. This one is in the 28th percentile – i.e., 28% of other outputs scored the same or lower than it.
So far Altmetric has tracked 1,141 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a little more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 5.1. This one is in the 21st percentile – i.e., 21% of its peers scored the same or lower than it.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 281,752 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one is in the 35th percentile – i.e., 35% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.
We're also able to compare this research output to 32 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one is in the 28th percentile – i.e., 28% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.