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Association between the incidence of varicella and meteorological conditions in Jinan, Eastern China, 2012–2014

Overview of attention for article published in BMC Infectious Diseases, April 2016
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Title
Association between the incidence of varicella and meteorological conditions in Jinan, Eastern China, 2012–2014
Published in
BMC Infectious Diseases, April 2016
DOI 10.1186/s12879-016-1507-1
Pubmed ID
Authors

Yunqing Yang, Xingyi Geng, Xiaoxue Liu, Weiru Wang, Ji Zhang

Abstract

Varicella remains an important public health issue in China. In this study we explored the effect of weather conditions on the incidence of varicella in the temperate city of Jinan, Eastern China during 2012-2014 to inform public health prevention and control measures. Data on reported cases of varicella were obtained from National Notifiable Disease Report System. Meteorological data for the same time period were obtained from the Jinan Meteorological Bureau. A negative binomial regression model was used to assess the relationships between meteorological variables and the incidence of varicella. Given collinearity between average temperature and atmospheric pressure, separate models were constructed: one including average temperature without atmospheric pressure, the other including atmospheric pressure but without average temperature. Both models included relative humidity, wind velocity, rainfall, sunshine, and year as independent variables. Annual incidence rates of varicella were 44.47, 53.69, and 46.81 per 100,000 for 2012, 2013, and 2014, respectively. Each increase of 100 Pa (hPa) in atmospheric pressure was estimated to be associated with an increase in weekly incidence of 3.35 % (95 % CI = 2.94-3.67 %), while a 1 °C rise in temperature was associated with a decrease of 3.44 % (95 % CI = -3.73-3.15 %) in the weekly incidence of varicella. Similarly, a 1 % rise in relative humidity corresponded to a decrease of 0.50 % or 1.00 %, a 1 h rise in sunshine corresponded to an increase of 1.10 % or 0.50 %, and a 1 mm rise in rainfall corresponded to an increase of 0.20 % or 0.30 %, in the weekly incidence of varicella cases, depending on the variable considered in the model. Our findings show that weather factors have a significant influence on the incidence of varicella. Meteorological conditions should be considered as important predictors of varicella incidence in Jinan, Eastern China.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profile of 1 tweeter who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 15 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 15 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Researcher 4 27%
Student > Master 3 20%
Student > Ph. D. Student 3 20%
Student > Postgraduate 1 7%
Student > Doctoral Student 1 7%
Other 3 20%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Medicine and Dentistry 5 33%
Nursing and Health Professions 4 27%
Environmental Science 2 13%
Unspecified 1 7%
Economics, Econometrics and Finance 1 7%
Other 2 13%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 1. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 30 April 2016.
All research outputs
#6,602,292
of 7,628,277 outputs
Outputs from BMC Infectious Diseases
#3,110
of 3,438 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#223,043
of 266,354 outputs
Outputs of similar age from BMC Infectious Diseases
#119
of 148 outputs
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