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Cross-sectional examination of the association between shift length and hospital nurses job satisfaction and nurse reported quality measures

Overview of attention for article published in BMC Nursing, May 2017
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About this Attention Score

  • In the top 5% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • One of the highest-scoring outputs from this source (#1 of 379)
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (99th percentile)
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (88th percentile)

Mentioned by

news
1 news outlet
twitter
308 tweeters
facebook
3 Facebook pages

Citations

dimensions_citation
22 Dimensions

Readers on

mendeley
107 Mendeley
Title
Cross-sectional examination of the association between shift length and hospital nurses job satisfaction and nurse reported quality measures
Published in
BMC Nursing, May 2017
DOI 10.1186/s12912-017-0221-7
Pubmed ID
Authors

Jane Ball, Tina Day, Trevor Murrells, Chiara Dall’Ora, Anne Marie Rafferty, Peter Griffiths, Jill Maben

Abstract

Twenty-four hour nursing care involves shift work including 12-h shifts. England is unusual in deploying a mix of shift patterns. International evidence on the effects of such shifts is growing. A secondary analysis of data collected in England exploring outcomes with 12-h shifts examined the association between shift length, job satisfaction, scheduling flexibility, care quality, patient safety, and care left undone. Data were collected from a questionnaire survey of nurses in a sample of English hospitals, conducted as part of the RN4CAST study, an EU 7(th) Framework funded study. The sample comprised 31 NHS acute hospital Trusts from 401 wards, in 46 acute hospital sites. Descriptive analysis included frequencies, percentages and mean scores by shift length, working beyond contracted hours and day or night shift. Multi-level regression models established statistical associations between shift length and nurse self-reported measures. Seventy-four percent (1898) of nurses worked a day shift and 26% (670) a night shift. Most Trusts had a mixture of shifts lengths. Self-reported quality of care was higher amongst nurses working ≤8 h (15.9%) compared to those working longer hours (20.0 to 21.1%). The odds of poor quality care were 1.64 times higher for nurses working ≥12 h (OR = 1.64, 95% CI 1.18-2.28, p = 0.003). Mean 'care left undone' scores varied by shift length: 3.85 (≤8 h), 3.72 (8.01-10.00 h), 3.80 (10.01-11.99 h) and were highest amongst those working ≥12 h (4.23) (p < 0.001). The rate of care left undone was 1.13 times higher for nurses working ≥12 h (RR = 1.13, 95% CI 1.06-1.20, p < 0.001). Job dissatisfaction was higher the longer the shift length: 42.9% (≥12 h (OR = 1.51, 95% CI 1.17-1.95, p = .001); 35.1% (≤8 h) 45.0% (8.01-10.00 h), 39.5% (10.01-11.99 h). Our findings add to the growing international body of evidence reporting that ≥12 shifts are associated with poor ratings of quality of care and higher rates of care left undone. Future research should focus on how 12-h shifts can be optimised to minimise potential risks.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 308 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 107 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 107 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Master 26 24%
Student > Bachelor 16 15%
Researcher 11 10%
Student > Ph. D. Student 9 8%
Student > Doctoral Student 7 7%
Other 22 21%
Unknown 16 15%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Nursing and Health Professions 52 49%
Medicine and Dentistry 13 12%
Psychology 6 6%
Environmental Science 3 3%
Engineering 3 3%
Other 8 7%
Unknown 22 21%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 227. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 02 December 2017.
All research outputs
#59,668
of 13,998,077 outputs
Outputs from BMC Nursing
#1
of 379 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#2,594
of 267,784 outputs
Outputs of similar age from BMC Nursing
#1
of 9 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 13,998,077 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done particularly well and is in the 99th percentile: it's in the top 5% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 379 research outputs from this source. They receive a mean Attention Score of 4.2. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 99% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 267,784 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 99% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 9 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has scored higher than all of them